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Microsoft Releases New Guidelines On Trash Talk – That Sucked, Potato, Cheap Win Allowed

New community standards allows a bit of trash talk but in a healthy way

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Game rage is common, and in a multiplayer session, we all had experienced weird talks especially if you are losing or causing a problem to a team. And there are those other players who find really hard to stay quiet. Well to keep things healthy and happy Microsoft had issued a guideline on “Trash Talks”.

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A little bit of trash talk is okay, but keep it clean” that’s what the official guide says and you will be happy to follow the acceptable trash talks like:

  1. Get destroyed. Can’t believe you thought you were on my level.
  2. That was some serious potato aim. Get wrecked.
  3. Only reason you went positive was you spent all game camping. Try again, kid.
  4. Cheap win. Come at me when you can actually drive without running cars off the road.
  5. That sucked. Get good and then come back when your k/d’s over 1.

Review the full guides on Xbox.com, there are a lot more to read. Xbox standards allow players to go with some healthy trash talks to release their game rage, but does it really works. At that moment it can be tough for a gamer to remember the guidelines, and if you break the same there are penalties and bans.

More from the guidelines on Trash Talk:

We get it—gaming can be competitive and interactions with other players can get heated. A little trash talk is an expected part of competitive multiplayer action, and that’s not a bad thing. But hate has no place here, and what’s not okay is when that trash talk turns into harassment.

Trash talk includes any lighthearted banter or bragging that focuses on the game at hand and encourages healthy competition. Harassment includes any negative behavior that’s personalized, disruptive, or likely to make someone feel unwelcome or unsafe. To qualify as harassment, the behavior doesn’t have to be drawn-out or persistent. Even a single abusive message could harm someone’s experience. Know when to draw the line, when to back off. Know and respect the other player.

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